Eat Real 2016, Everything is Better on a Stick (or Hipsters Ruin Everything)

Oakland - Eat Real Festival 2010 (Michael Halberstadt/www.siliconvalleystock.com)
Oakland – Eat Real Festival 2010 (Michael Halberstadt/www.siliconvalleystock.com)

Food trucks have been one of my go to subjects for stock photography. I’m quite fond of food for one.

Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)

So, I headed out to Eat Real again for the 2016 festivities. You can see the photos here.

Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)

I spend waste a lot of time trying to come up with witty remarks to post on this unread blog. So the line I came up that applies to this style of photography is: “Everything is Better on a Stick.” Get it? I’m trying to get photos that are different than everybody else’s. So I don’t have the closeups here, just overviews from above.

Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)

Another thought has been brewing in my tiny little noggin about food trucks I thought I’d try and develop my thoughts here.

The summary goes something like this: “Hipsters ruin everything”

Are you old enough to remember when live-work lofts were not trendy? The whole idea behind this concept was taking property that nobody wanted and developing cheap housing largely for artists and creatives. All of a sudden, wealthy hipsters with tech jobs saw lofts on TV and moved in from the suburbs to drive up the cost of artists’ residences so creatives could no longer afford them.

Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)

This “hipsters ruin everything” concept has moved on to food trucks. Or that’s how I’m seeing it. This idea came to me as I was over by San Pedro Square in San Jose on farmers’ market day. There was a line of food trucks in amongst the fruit and veg. I was hungry and passed a falafel truck. There I noticed that a falafel- in my view a good, but very working class sort of food- and as I recall the (sandwich, pocket, or whatever) cost about $10.

Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Eat Real 2016, Jack London Square, Oakland (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)

Yet within just a few feet were at least two brick-and-mortar restaurants that also served falafel- for less money too! There’s Robee’s Falafel in the San Pedro Square Marketplace that’s pretty good as I recall. And right around the corner there’s Nick the Greek. Then there’s the mothership of all Bay Area falafel joints Falafel’s Drive in about 10 minutes away with areguably the best falafel for many miles and it’s just $5/6.75 (small/large.)

 

San Jose, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Falafel’s Drive In, San Jose, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

Now admittedly, I didn’t try all of these options. Maybe the food truck is by far the best.

But my point here is that the idea behind “roach coaches” or the fancier offspring was to provide food on a budget for industrial parks and other underserved areas. Their raison d’être has been destroyed by the food truck trend. As a rule, food trucks shouldn’t be parked next to perfectly good established restaurants and charging even more for their produce.

Please pardon this slightly off topic rant and if you’re looking for photos – let me know.