The Architect of Death

One of the most beautiful and unique places in the Bay Area is the Mountain View cemetery in the Oakland Hills. The sprawling historical cemetery is home to a handful of well known figures. Looking at “Millionaire’s Row” there are lots of names Bay Area residents will recognize- if not for the person entombed, then for the institutions, products, street signs that bear their names.

Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA
Millionaire’s Row, Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA

For example Chabot, for whom the Chabot Science Center in Oakland, J. A. Folger, founder of Folgers Coffee, Domingo Ghirardelli, namesake of the Ghirardelli Chocolate Company, Henry J. Kaiser, father of modern American shipbuilding (and I think somehow related to the Kaiser Building and insurance?), Charles Crocker of Crocker Bank fame, etc.

Millionaire's Row, Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA
Millionaire’s Row, Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA

One lesser known fact casual visitors won’t likely know, is that the landscape architect of the cemetery has a few other projects you may have heard of. Mountain View cemetery was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, if you haven’t heard of this cemetery, you likely are familiar with New York City’s Central Park, another one of his projects. He’s also responsible for two more Bay Area gems: Stanford and UC Berkeley campuses.

Long Daylight Exposure of Obelisk at Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland, CA
Long Daylight Exposure of Obelisk at Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland, CA

Quick Update

I’ve been having trouble keeping up. Here are a few photos from the last few days- San Jose – Marin County – Wine Country and so forth. The only samples I didn’t post are the VeryHighDPI.com stuff – the gigapixel images stock project we’ve been working on.

California Landscape (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
California Landscape (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Old Saint Mary's Church of Nicasio Valley (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Old Saint Mary’s Church of Nicasio Valley (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
San Pedro Square, San Jose, CA (Michael Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
San Pedro Square, San Jose, CA (Michael Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
San Pedro Square, San Jose, CA (Michael Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
San Pedro Square, San Jose, CA (Michael Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Chardonnay Grapes (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Chardonnay Grapes (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Tomales Presbyterian Church, Tomales, CA (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)
Tomales Presbyterian Church, Tomales, CA (M. Halberstadt / SiliconValleyStock.com)

New Unique Stock Photo Galleries added to the Library

I’ve been plotting and scheming – trying to showcase stock photographs I have that are unique in one way or another.

So I’ve put together a few new galleries. There are a couple of topics to disseminate:

San Francisco, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo of Slightly Elevated view of Cable Car turnabout – San Francisco, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Technique: Unique slightly aerial perspective
This is looking slightly down using a special secret technique) I’m calling that Looking down at ______. I’ve got a gallery setup in that category for Silicon Valley and Seattle (and environs.)

Seattle (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Slightly Elevated view of the Original Starbucks, Seattle (Michael Halberstadt)
Extremely High Resolution Stock Photograph Landscape with Lone Oak Tree (printable at ca. 20' x 10' @ 100 ppi un-upresed) (Michael Halberstadt)
Extremely High Resolution Stock Photograph Landscape with Lone Oak Tree (printable at ca. 20′ x 10′ @ 100 ppi un-upresed) (Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Technique: Very, Very large files
I’ve been working on expanding my really large files library. I can also do custom shots as needed. I’ve got a few photos that are in the gigapixel range.

 (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Silicon Valley Skyline (prints about 5’x11′ @100ppi uninterpolated) (Michael Halberstadt)

I’m tempted to overdramatize this process as I found here with this Bentley ad. Basically it’s a bunch of bullshit, here’s a snippet of how they make their technique sound interesting:

Impressive, eh? Bentley created the massive photo by stitching together 700 separate photos using NASA’s panorama stitching technology — the same kind used to create panoramas of Mars shot by the Curiosity rover. In all, the project took 6 months to plan, 6 days to shoot, and 2.5 months to retouch.

“An incredible 4,425 times larger than a typical smartphone image, this extraordinary photograph is made up of approximately 53 billion pixels (or 53,000 megapixels),” Bentley writes. “The result, if reproduced in standard print format, would be the size of a football field.”

But this is using the same gear I’ve got. Plus it’s not sharp, except the car. And the car shot has so much detail it has to be fake. If the photo was made as they claimed almost a kilometer away in an area where there’s also always wind, this just isn’t possible. The photographer here was Simon Stock (the photographer equivalent of a “porn name”- a surname “stock.”) I guess the lesson to learn here is that gross exaggeration (or worse) is how to sell yourself and product.

Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo of the 9th Ave. Terminal (Brooklyn Basin) Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Technique: Long Exposure
My setup allows me to take really long exposures, even during the day. This can make for a really unusual look- especially when the main subject is stationary: architecture, landscape etc and also includes motion: water, clouds, etc.

Bay Bridge Stock Photo (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)
You Can’t Take this Photo anymore (taken from the demolished old section)Bay Bridge Stock Photo (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Access:
This is where I’ve been able to photograph with special access. For example I managed to gain access to some high rises in San Jose and Oakland and get some really unique shots, or the San Francisco Bay Bridge during construction and BART with a tripod.

 (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)
Bank of America (former Bank of Italy) Landmark Historic Building in downtown San Jose (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)
Embarcadero BART Station (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Embarcadero BART Station (Michael Halberstadt)

And of course there’s all the usual stock photo stuff. Let me know if you don’t find what you’re looking for. I added a new item to the SiliconValleyStock webpage to make photo requests. Due to some changes at my old stock photo library to which I contributed, I’m gonna have to be much more proactive about selling my own work.

Wish me luck!

Oakland: A Few Stock Photos of Tribune Tower

Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

Oakland has been on my radar for a while. The Dot-Com craziness has finally found its way east. Recently news outlets have been going gaga over the previously overlooked Bay Area city, the New York Times even dubbed it Brooklyn by the Bay.

Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

As I recall, Gertrude Stein famously said about Oakland: There is no there there. In researching my present subject, the Tribune Tower in the center of Oakland, I read that they actually put a “There” sign on the tower to make light of Stein’s comments.

In any case, I’d wanted to photograph the tower with some dramatic angles and clouds for a while. In photographing in much of Oakland I find myself somewhat torn between the beauty that is Oakland’s urban core and the chaos and lawlessness it’s known for. Tribune Tower has also been in the news alot lately, I think there’s some sort of bankruptcy issues with the (former) owner.

Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

I had a reasonably good experience in that regard during this shoot. My perch was the spot on Broadway right next to the 12th Street Bart entrance. With my Sony A7r on a tripod I got a few looks: some friendly, some suspicious. I got a few really dumb comments like the usual, “What, are you some kind of terrorist or something?” “Yes”, I replied, “I’m going to blow up that building with this magical camera” hoping in vein the idiot who made the comment might notice how dumb his question was.

I did see my fair share of bad behavior while doing my thing. There was a group of about a dozen people across the street congregating in front of the Burger King for nearly the entire time talking very loudly- occasionally shouting to other people (in a friendly manner) across various street corners. The kid in the bunch was bouncing his basket ball off the transom windows of the historic building.

Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

In that entire couple hours I think I saw one police cruiser despite the fact that the main police HQ is a very short distance down Broadway, the street I was on. At one point there was a guy on a dirt bike, with no license plate. He started doing wheelies in the center of the intersection, then went off the wrong way on a one way street, only to reappear on the sidewalk. Even after dark, he was riding around in violation of most of the vehicle code and with no lights in front or back (not just not on, but there was no light on the bike, period.)

Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Tribune Tower, Oakland, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

But despite all the complete lack of first world order, I managed to photograph without being hurt or seriously threatened. And I got a few good shots too.

Many of the photos I did employed one of my fun tricks: long daylight exposures. The trick is that I put a really dark grey filter in front of the lens, allowing exposures up to about 30 seconds during the daytime. The end result is that stationary objects, like in this case the Tribune Building tower remain stationary (of course) but the clouds move and leave streaky patterns. This is hit or miss- you knever know for sure what’s going to happen in the next half minute or so.

Another thing I’ve been trying to do is frame for book covers. I thought of this as a potential book cover project. For a complete book jacket, the subject has to be on the far right and have room on the left for a spine and the back. Seems at some point somebody’s going to be writing another book on Oakland and need a cover.

But you be the judge. I think some of these came out quite well. What do you think?

 

Oakland’s 9th Avenue Terminal and Brooklyn Basin

Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)
Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)

For years I’ve noticed an interesting building from highway 880 but never got around to viewing it up close. Finally I made the short detour only to find that this handsome facade is both a) really cool for photography and b) scheduled for demolition.

Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)
Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)

The area will soon be home to a ginormous development project dubbed Brooklyn Basin.

Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)
Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)

Pity that such a historic landmark will be demolished, but what are you gonna do?