Go Ahead…. Call It Frisko

With my apologies to Herb Caen

Ultra High Resolution Panoramic Stock Photograph of San Francisco from Above (prints at ca. 15' x 5' @100ppi un-upresed) (M Halberstadt/SiliconValleyStock.com)
Ultra High Resolution Panoramic Stock Photograph of San Francisco from Above (prints at ca. 15′ x 5′ or 5 x 2.5 meters  @100ppi un-upresed) (M Halberstadt/SiliconValleyStock.com)

After a previous engagement in The City I pulled out my pano machine and got to work. Requests for extra high resolutions stock photos of the City by the Bay are common and it was a clearer than average day in the Bay Area.

Originally I planned to head over to the Golden Gate Bridge and shoot from both the Marin and San Francisco sides. But as I saw traffic building up in front of me, and coincidentally looked up to the iconic Sutro Tower I changed my mind. And off to Twin Peaks I drove.

The top of Twin Peaks wasn’t the only thing that was high up top. As I did a quick site and wind survey the pot smell was as strong as I’d guess one would smell on the set of a Cheech and Chong movie. But my real problem was the wind. Gusts rip over the peak from the Pacific Ocean behind me. My pano machine is pretty sturdy, but not enough to stay still for the one second exposures I anticipated making when the winds approached hurricane speeds.

A short time after the sun set, the light got really nice. I hunkered down right below the parking area below seeking a spot that was partially sheltered from the wind. In addition to the benefits of reduction in wind, I found myself about three feet below the tourists posing with the city in the background right behind me. At one point I turned around to find myself only inches from the bum of a very attractive gal 😉 My method of protecting my rig from wind gusts did work, but must have looked quite awkweird. I opened my jacket, and stood as close as I could to the setup without obscuring the lens. I look weird enough without all my camera kit. But this must have appeared especially odd if viewed from the wrong angle, reminiscent of this poster that was pinned up in Mr Bernucci’s photo class at my old high school.

But then again, Frisko is full of all sorts of strange characters. I might just fit in!

 

 

 

From the Archive: San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge From the Middle Lane

Almost Impossible: Long Exposure from the Center Lane of the Bay Bridge
Almost Impossible: Long Exposure from the Center Lane of the Bay Bridge

I still have to pinch myself. Did this really happen? Right before the official opening of the new Eastern Span of the Oakland – San Francisco Bay Bridge a friend let me in with his special access.

Bay Bridge Stock Photo

We drove around on an almost empty bridge free of all but construction and CHP traffic. We stopped pretty much wherever we wanted. Nights we could even set up our tripods right in the middle lane of the bridge and make long exposures.

Bay Bridge Stock Photo

My friends at Oakland Magazine previously got me press access onto the Bay Bridge on a wet and windy night to document the LED art installation. We could setup our tripods for this access, which was nice. But since there was still auto traffic, the bridge shook and long exposures were fruitless.

San Francisco - Oakland Bay Bridge (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt/Michael Halberstadt)
San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge Press Event for LED Light Installtion (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt/Michael Halberstadt)

I could have kept shooting there for weeks if they let us. These are the views photographers like me find so beautifully frustrating: so beautiful, yet unattainable. It’s what we see stuck in traffic and think if only I could just park my car and pull out my camera.

Bay Bridge Stock Photo

My parting shot was a long exposure disturbed by a CHP call to “leave now” minutes before the official opening.

The CHP came by and said get off now- we're about to open to the public. I picked up my tripod and headed to the car while still exposing. (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)
Parting Shot: The CHP came by and said get off now- we’re about to open to the public. I picked up my tripod and headed to the car while still exposing. (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)