The Architect of Death

One of the most beautiful and unique places in the Bay Area is the Mountain View cemetery in the Oakland Hills. The sprawling historical cemetery is home to a handful of well known figures. Looking at “Millionaire’s Row” there are lots of names Bay Area residents will recognize- if not for the person entombed, then for the institutions, products, street signs that bear their names.

Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA
Millionaire’s Row, Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA

For example Chabot, for whom the Chabot Science Center in Oakland, J. A. Folger, founder of Folgers Coffee, Domingo Ghirardelli, namesake of the Ghirardelli Chocolate Company, Henry J. Kaiser, father of modern American shipbuilding (and I think somehow related to the Kaiser Building and insurance?), Charles Crocker of Crocker Bank fame, etc.

Millionaire's Row, Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA
Millionaire’s Row, Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, CA

One lesser known fact casual visitors won’t likely know, is that the landscape architect of the cemetery has a few other projects you may have heard of. Mountain View cemetery was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, if you haven’t heard of this cemetery, you likely are familiar with New York City’s Central Park, another one of his projects. He’s also responsible for two more Bay Area gems: Stanford and UC Berkeley campuses.

Long Daylight Exposure of Obelisk at Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland, CA
Long Daylight Exposure of Obelisk at Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland, CA

The Legion of Honor

Legion of Honor, Museum in San Francisco, CA

After purchasing a lens, I found myself in San Francisco wondering what to do before going home. I pulled up my Google My Maps – and I have a map of stock photo related stuff to photograph in SF.

Legion of Honor, Museum in San Francisco, CA

Not too far away was The Legion of Honor. I have fond memories of the place. My soon-to-be girlfriend and later wife Bridget and I flirted there on a field trip. My step dad and mom took us kids there for a visit to the museum and we picnicked out front.

Legion of Honor, Museum in San Francisco, CA

This time I intended to make this a short trip. Traffic in the Bay Area is insane now, and I try to avoid driving over the Bay Bridge after 3pm or before 7pm. Fortunately I have reciprocal membership from the San Jose Museum of Art, allowing me to rush in-and-out of museums without trying to squeeze the last $15 out of the entry fee.

Legion of Honor, Museum in San Francisco, CA

In any case I got a few good shots inside and out I think. But hope to return soon and spend a bit more time.

Legion of Honor, Museum in San Francisco, CA

Cornerstone Sonoma

We were on a recon mission for VeryHighDPI.com looking for sweeping Wine Country scenes for Gigapixel photos we’re making. But first there was a pit stop at Cornerstone in Sonoma.

Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Sunset Test Garden, Cornerstone, Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)

Cornerstone is one of those cutesy Whine Country places. There’s a bunch of shops and restaurants and some beautifully manicured landscape architecture. There are also a number of interesting sculptures and the like.

Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Sunset Test Garden, Cornerstone, Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)

More recently, Sunset Magazine moved their test kitchen and Garden to Cornerstone. They used to be headquartered in Menlo Park, but I’m assuming the dot-con craziness got to them. Or at least it’s hard to justify sticking around in a building that’s worth $50 million when you could more easily work out of a $2 million office two hours away.

Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Sunset Test Garden, Cornerstone, Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)

In writing this I remembered that my grandfather had a recipe for salad dressing in one of the Sunset cookbooks or magazines or something back in the 1950’s. So I thought it would be fun if I could find it via Google Books. No luck regarding the recipe, but a couple of hits came up for photo credits. Unfortunately they are in snippet view, so I have no idea what the photos were.

Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Sunset Test Garden, Cornerstone, Sonoma, California (Michael Halberstadt)

The next stop was Point Reyes and I’ll add another entry for that part of the trip as soon as I can!

 

New Unique Stock Photo Galleries added to the Library

I’ve been plotting and scheming – trying to showcase stock photographs I have that are unique in one way or another.

So I’ve put together a few new galleries. There are a couple of topics to disseminate:

San Francisco, CA (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo of Slightly Elevated view of Cable Car turnabout – San Francisco, CA (Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Technique: Unique slightly aerial perspective
This is looking slightly down using a special secret technique) I’m calling that Looking down at ______. I’ve got a gallery setup in that category for Silicon Valley and Seattle (and environs.)

Seattle (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Slightly Elevated view of the Original Starbucks, Seattle (Michael Halberstadt)
Extremely High Resolution Stock Photograph Landscape with Lone Oak Tree (printable at ca. 20' x 10' @ 100 ppi un-upresed) (Michael Halberstadt)
Extremely High Resolution Stock Photograph Landscape with Lone Oak Tree (printable at ca. 20′ x 10′ @ 100 ppi un-upresed) (Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Technique: Very, Very large files
I’ve been working on expanding my really large files library. I can also do custom shots as needed. I’ve got a few photos that are in the gigapixel range.

 (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Silicon Valley Skyline (prints about 5’x11′ @100ppi uninterpolated) (Michael Halberstadt)

I’m tempted to overdramatize this process as I found here with this Bentley ad. Basically it’s a bunch of bullshit, here’s a snippet of how they make their technique sound interesting:

Impressive, eh? Bentley created the massive photo by stitching together 700 separate photos using NASA’s panorama stitching technology — the same kind used to create panoramas of Mars shot by the Curiosity rover. In all, the project took 6 months to plan, 6 days to shoot, and 2.5 months to retouch.

“An incredible 4,425 times larger than a typical smartphone image, this extraordinary photograph is made up of approximately 53 billion pixels (or 53,000 megapixels),” Bentley writes. “The result, if reproduced in standard print format, would be the size of a football field.”

But this is using the same gear I’ve got. Plus it’s not sharp, except the car. And the car shot has so much detail it has to be fake. If the photo was made as they claimed almost a kilometer away in an area where there’s also always wind, this just isn’t possible. The photographer here was Simon Stock (the photographer equivalent of a “porn name”- a surname “stock.”) I guess the lesson to learn here is that gross exaggeration (or worse) is how to sell yourself and product.

Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo of the 9th Ave. Terminal (Brooklyn Basin) Oakland (Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Technique: Long Exposure
My setup allows me to take really long exposures, even during the day. This can make for a really unusual look- especially when the main subject is stationary: architecture, landscape etc and also includes motion: water, clouds, etc.

Bay Bridge Stock Photo (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)
You Can’t Take this Photo anymore (taken from the demolished old section)Bay Bridge Stock Photo (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)

Unique Access:
This is where I’ve been able to photograph with special access. For example I managed to gain access to some high rises in San Jose and Oakland and get some really unique shots, or the San Francisco Bay Bridge during construction and BART with a tripod.

 (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)
Bank of America (former Bank of Italy) Landmark Historic Building in downtown San Jose (Photographer: Michael Halberstadt)
Embarcadero BART Station (Michael Halberstadt)
Stock Photo: Embarcadero BART Station (Michael Halberstadt)

And of course there’s all the usual stock photo stuff. Let me know if you don’t find what you’re looking for. I added a new item to the SiliconValleyStock webpage to make photo requests. Due to some changes at my old stock photo library to which I contributed, I’m gonna have to be much more proactive about selling my own work.

Wish me luck!